Ellen Reid and Matt Cook: Conjuring the American Dream and Virtual Reality

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Percussionist Matt Cook and composer Ellen Reid have known each other since their days as graduate students at CalArts, and have been regular, close collaborators ever since. Reid is in residence at National Sawdust this season, and this week brings an east coast rendezvous when Los Angeles Percussion Quartet performs Reid's Fear | Release during the group's New York debut concert, at National Sawdust on June 1.

Yellow Barn: Taking It to the Streets

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Yellow Barn, the famously intrepid summer chamber music festival, is bringing the concept of “taking the show on the road” to a new level. In October 2015, the center introduced Music Haul, a mobile stage in the back of a truck that allows Yellow Barn’s musicians to perform virtually anywhere it can travel to. Having already visited Boston, Baltimore, and Dallas, Music Haul is undertaking its most ambitious voyage yet: “Music No Boundaries: NYC,” a nine-day residency.

Joan La Barbara: Finding the Right Words to Inspire Sound

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Joan La Barbara will turn 70 years old in June, but shows no signs of slowing down. La Barbara will premiere her new song cycle, The Wanderlusting of Joseph C., at Roulette in Brooklyn on May 24. The song cycle breaks with La Barbara’s usual style of vocal abstractions and moves firmly into the realm of language.

Mariel Robert and Eric Wubbels: Intensity and Immersion

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As both a member of the highly regarding Mivos Quartet and as a solo artist in her own right, cellist Mariel Roberts has demonstrated an affinity for uncompromising music and a capacity for making even the most challenging works sing. Composer Eric Wubbels is among the numerous beneficiaries of Roberts's advocacy – his gretchen Am Spinnrade, a duo for cello and piano, is featured on Roberts's new CD, Cartography, with Wubbels himself at the piano. In advance of an album-release concert at National Sawdust on May 19, as well as a New York Philharmonic Contact! program that includes Wubbels's katachi coming up at National Sawdust on May 22, the two sat down recently at a neighborhood café to compare experiences and agendas.

Tristan Perich and Christopher Tignor: Intuitive Processes

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Though it's not exactly a case of "opposites attract," those who know the music of composer-performers Tristan Perich and Christopher Tignor might not automatically pair the two creators despite a shared association with electroacoustic music and technical ingenuity. Yet in a recent interview in advance of their joint appearance at National Sawdust on May 5, they discovered a healthy amount of overlap in their working methods and philosophies.

What Controversial Changes at Harvard Mean for Music in the University

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University curricular reform doesn’t typical ignite fiery internet controversy. But last month, when The Harvard Crimson reported on the adoption of a new undergraduate curriculum at Harvard, the classical music corner of the internet—composers, performers, theorists, musicologists – briefly erupted in intense discussion. As a musicologist and professor myself, I wanted to learn about the background behind these changes, what they mean for students, and the implications of the controversy for our field.

Du Yun: The Pulitzer Prize, MATA, and Fostering Diversity

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Du Yun was chilling out in a Dubai bar after a long day of networking at Culture Summit 2017, when her phone suddenly went berserk: she had just been awarded the 2017 Pulitzer Prize in Music.

Zachary Woolfe: Curating Cultural Experiences in the Digital Domain

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Zachary Woolfe started attracting attention immediately when he came to The New York Times as a freelance classical-music reviewer in 2010, having written stylishly and persuasively already for numerous publications and outlets in New York City and elsewhere. In March 2015 the Times named Woolfe its classical music editor, even as the paper was undergoing one of the most penetrating periods of self-evaluation in its history: the so-called 2020 Group, tasked with re-imagining the way this venerable institution envisioned and engaged its mission during a time of seismic change and financial straits throughout the entire media industry. In a recent interview at The New York Times offices, Woolfe addressed those changes, large and small, during an exceedingly generous and wide-ranging conversation.

Anne Midgette: Extending the Conversation on Social Media

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One of the best known and most respected journalists and critics in the realm of classical music and opera, Anne Midgette has also been among the more tenacious advocates of changing with the times, embracing new media platforms, techniques, and modes of storytelling – including Facebook and Twitter.

R. Andrew Lee: Maximal Minimalist on the Facebook Frontier

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Ask any musician who makes a habit of playing so-called minimalist music, in any of the various shades and permutations of that term, about the secrets to success; the answer likely would involve qualities like patience, stamina, perseverance, and faith in the value of the undertaking. Look at the burgeoning career of R. Andrew Lee, a pianist and pedagogue whose sterling reputation largely resides in his exemplary performances and recordings of minimal music, and you see precisely the same qualities in play.